Lee Speaks About Music… #111

This Was (50th Anniversary Book Edition) – Jethro Tull

190295611484.sml

Introduction…

Another splendid package just hit the shelves so to speak and this is the 10th Jethro Tull album to be re-released in these rather splendid Book Editions that come in the form of an hardback book the size of a DVD and as well as a book you get 4 discs that fit very nicely in the package. This Was… was the bands debut album that was originally released some 50 years ago now way back in 1968, and the album and the band are very much celebrating their 50th Anniversary, and once again are doing so in GREAT! style by presenting this quality well made package. Just like the 9 albums that got released in the same style with these really GREAT! packages, I can tell you they certainly do not disappoint and are quality all the way.

45887876_351804552242186_416869989606227968_n

Perhaps the only thing that does disappoint me so far about these really GREAT! packages can be seen by looking at the picture above, and that is that the 1970 album Benefit still has not been given the same treatment yet, and my 2013 Collectors Edition just does not look right stacked up against this lot somehow :)))).

50 years is pretty much a long musical career to be still going out there today and for Ian Anderson to be still going out there and still performing many of the songs from the bands lengthy career. Though Anderson himself has been performing for slightly longer and first started his musical adventure way back in 1963 in The Blades alongside John Evans and Jeffrey Hammond. The Blades went through a few incarnations between 1963 – 1965 and by that year Barrie Barlow had joined the band and all 4 members eventually wound up in Jethro Tull at one point or another.

In the same year The Blades changed its name to The John Evan Band. A band that had a few line up changes itself along with a few name changes along the way between the years of 1965 – 1967, and this band actually went through 8 incarnations predominantly as a 7 piece outfit. Though Jeffrey Hammond dropped out of the band after 3 incarnations of the band back in 1966 and was replaced by Derek Ward who was replaced himself by Glen Cornick in 1967. By this time Anderson was gaining more confidence and his songwriting had started to develop a bit more, but success was a long way away from a struggling musician who found it hard to even afford enough money to eat never mind put some sort of a roof over his head having gone out into that world from the comfort of his parents house.

Both Anderson and Cornick shared a bedsit at some point to cut down the cost of the rent and would often live on a tin of Irish Stew between them. I suppose it was towards the end of 1967 that both of them decided a change was needed and they started to look for another guitar player. It was whilst they were playing a gig supporting McGregor’s Engine that they clapped their eyes on Mick Abrahams and Clive Bunker happened to be that bands drummer too. After a chat backstage in the dressing room both Abrahams and Bunker agreed to join The John Evan Band to which most of it’s members decided to leave and the 8th and last incarnation of The John Evan Band did not even have John Evans in it himself and consisted of Ian Anderson, Mick Abrahams, Glen Cornick, Clive Bunker and Tony Wilkinson on sax.

By 1968 Wilkinson had dropped out leaving them as a four piece and their search for a new name was over when Dave Robson a booker at the Ellis-Wright Agency suggested the name Jethro Tull and the band played their first official gig under that name at London’s Legendary Marquee Club on the 2nd February 1968. It was only a couple of weeks after that gig that the music press announced that the bands first single would be released on the MGM Record Label with the Mick Abrahams song “Sunshine Day” as the A side and the song “Aeroplane” penned by Ian Anderson & Glen Cornick was chosen for the B side.

Single

The fact that the bands name had been misspelt as Jethro Toe may have appeared that the band were not off to a flying start, but that was not the only spelling mistake. They also misspelt Glen Cornick’s Christian name as Len instead of Glen though the surname of Barnard was right and was the name Cornick had been using at that time. But in the end the band was spared the cock ups and embarrassment simply because both Chris Wright and Terry Ellis could not negotiate the deal with MGM and refused to sign the contract preventing the single from being officially released. Although a few copies did sneak out and are thought to fetch between £500 – £1,000 these days.

The Packaging & Artwork…

45783533_167865270833917_408310175619874816_n

As with all these splendid packages they are very sturdy and very well constructed by using plastic trays to hold the discs firmly in place, and how they have been well sealed and fixed into a quality hardback book. Everything about this package is sheer quality and well thought out with its presentation being the same size of DVD so you can easily store it along with your DVD’s and Blu Rays.

Besides all the GREAT! music and bonus extras you get on the discs, the other really GREAT! thing about these packages is the book it comes with, and this one has 98 pages in total that contain a lot of information about when the album was made and how everything came together from the offset, including the production side of things. You also get some great glossary photos along with all the linear notes and lyrics.

To give you a better idea just what the package looks like I have made a video with myself talking you through it. Though it’s nowhere as informative as my lengthy review here, and I am not the most confident guy to be able to present a review like I have written here by simply talking about it. But nevertheless least you can see the package and how much easier a package like this can be stored.

The Artwork.

The albums artwork concept was done by Ian Anderson and Terry Ellis and it may have been Anderson’s idea to have them all dress up as old men for the front cover photo shoot. They also included 3 dogs whose owners were there for the shoot so that they could control their dogs and one of them bit Glen Cornick on the back of the leg during the time of setting the photo shoot up. Both the front and back cover photographs were taken by Brian Ward. Additional photos for this package was provided by Martin Webb. Max Browne & Hajo Muller.

It was also Anderson’s idea not to include the name of the band or title of the album on the front cover too, and his reasoning behind it was so that people would look at the front cover and have to pick it up and look at the back to see who it was by. That way if people did do that they more or less were 50% of the way to selling the album. Even more bizarre was the picture on the back of the cover of Ian Anderson holding the scales of a fish to which had totally nothing to do with anything on the album.

When questioned as has to if it meant anything, he said that Salvador Dali made a living from it and Rene Magritte did pretty well and when you grow up as an art student you learn the value of surreal eccentricity in getting attention.

This Was (50th Anniversary Book Edition) Review…

The 50th Anniversary 3 CD/1 DVD Book Edition of This Was by Jethro Tull was released on the 9th November 2018. I pre-ordered my copy of it from Amazon on the 29th August and got for £30.63 which was a bit cheaper than it’s £34.99 retail price tag. As a rule it does mostly pay to pre-order these type of releases as soon as possible to save that bit extra on the overall price.

For example also being released on the 23rd of this month is the Clutching At Straws 4 CD/1 Blu Ray Book Edition by Marillion to which I pre-ordered on the 7th September. You can still pre-order it right now, however it will cost you some £35.90. But I shall be getting it for £22.73 which is quite a saving.

As a matter of fact 3 of the 10 Jethro Tull DVD Book Editions I only paid £14 for them. 4 of them cost between £18 – £20. 1 was £27.50 and it was only the last 2 I brought that cost me £30  by pre-ordering them on Amazon. The good thing about pre-ordering anything on Amazon is the fact that you do not pay for the item until the week it’s due to be released and on the day they actually dispatch the item to you, which is mainly the day before it’s release.

The original album This Was got released way back on the 4th October 1968 and contained 10 tracks that had an overall playing time of 38 minutes, 21 seconds. The album was released on Island records and recorded at Sound Techniques Studios in Chelsea London. It was also produced by Terry Ellis and Jethro Tull and engineered by Victor Gamm. The album cost around £1,200 to make, money that neither Ellis & Wright had at the time, but Ellis wanted to do things right by the band after the bad experience he had with Ten Years After at Decca Records.

He could not get a record label interested enough to take on Jethro Tull to put up the money to make the album, so with what money Ellis & Wright did have they started to look for a cheap enough studio and he was put onto Sound Techniques by Pink Floyd’s agent at the time Bryan Morrison. With what money they did have, they managed to get 3 tracks recorded and mixed and Ellis had to get a loan from his bank to complete the album. No doubt it was a gamble but one that paid off in the end.

Capture

Sound Techniques Studios

Sound Techniques Studios has quite a bit of history since it opened its doors in mid 1965 and closed its doors in 1976 and many mainstream artists had recorded at the studios including the likes of Elton John, Nick Drake, Fairport Convention, Cat Stevens, Pentangle, The Yardbirds, The Who, Stackridge, John Martyn, Magna Carta and many more. Pink Floyd even recorded their first two singles “Arnold Lane” and “See Emily Play” there, and much more went on inside this studio than what meets the eye.

The studio itself was founded by recording engineers Geoff Frost and John Wood who had both been working at Levy’s Sound Studio in the centre of London. It was during 1964 that Morris Levy was going to be selling up his studio and both Frost and Wood decided that maybe they should set up a studio themselves. Frost left Levy’s in September of the same year to look for a place to set up a studio, and by December 1964  Frost eventually found a property that had been a former dairy located at 46a Old Church Street, Chelsea, London, with both the first and second floors available to lease.

It was in that same month of December 1964 that they registered the name of the company and Wood also left Levy’s so they could make alterations to the couple of floors they had leased to their own requirements for their new studio. Because of lack of funds both Wood and Frost designed and built most their own studio equipment from Frost’s background experience in electronics and being the chief engineer at Levy’s.

Frost learnt a lot about amplification from his days in the army and always had an interest in building his own mixing desks, and this is where there was a lot more to this studio than meets the eye. As well as having a fully functional studio to record many artists, they also created a workshop to which Frost spent most of his time building mixing consoles. Other engineers were that impressed by his work that they wanted his mixing consoles in their studios too, and it was not long before Frost and his team manufactured desks for other studios such as the Music Centre and Trident Studios.

Mixing Consolses

Many more artists were recorded on consoles designed and built by Frost and his mixing consoles were even used to do Queen’s first 3 albums. Sadly the studio closed in 1976 when the lease on the building ran out, and Frost and Wood were unable to purchase the property due to lack of funds. But since 2014 they have been working on a documentary to which both Neil Innes & Nick Turner are directing which is titled The Parts You Don’t Hear/The Untold Story Of Sound Techniques and I have to say it looks very interesting indeed from this teaser trailer video that was put on Vimeo 3 years ago.

The documentary film is still very much in the making and both Innes and Turner have interviewed many of the artists, engineers and those who remember their time at Sound Techniques and how it innovated the making of music. Ian Anderson recalls his time there and it was a very educational one too, and he learnt quite a bit from Victor Gamm who was the engineer for the This Was album, and it even helped him setup his own future regarding being a producer and sound engineer himself. He will also feature in the documentary.

You can find out more about who will be featured in the documentary and just how much the studio brought to the music industry to which they are still updating on their website here:  http://www.soundtechniquesmovie.com/

The Package Contents…

This particular box set comes with an array of bonus tracks over the 3 CD’s that come with it plus a DVD that comes with a 4.1 surround mix of the album and 5.1 surround mix of a couple of bonus tracks. It also comes with a vast lot of information in the 98 page book you get too. But first let’s take a look at the CD’s that come in the package.

CD 1.

The first disc contains all the new Steve Wilson mixes of the original albums 10 tracks plus it has a further 6 bonus tracks, and this disc with all 16 tracks comes with an overall playing time of 57 minutes, 45 seconds. In this section of my review I am only going to focus on the bonus tracks rather than the main album tracks to which I will go through in my main review of the albums 10 tracks. Out of the 6 bonus tracks on the first disc you do get 4 that are previously unreleased, though 3 of them are just alternative takes and only 1 of them has never seen the light of day before.

The first couple of bonus tracks “Love Story” and “A Christmas Song” are nothing new and have featured on many compiled and live albums before. Both of these songs were recorded after the album later on in the year at Morgan Studios London on an 8 track rather than the 4 track recorder that the album was recorded on at Sound Techniques. The first of them on the 30th October 1968 and second a few days later in November. Both songs were also released in the following month of December 1968 as a single with “Love Story” being the A-Side and was the first time Anderson had started to learn to play the mandolin and it was the last song that was recorded with Mick Abrahams.

This was actually the 2nd official Jethro Tull single and early copies miscredited the songwriter as Ian Henderson. I have always loved the B-Side “A Christmas Song” a lot more and it’s always been one of my all time favourite Christmas Songs. Anderson also played the mandolin on this track too and as Mick Abrahams was not present David Palmer was brought in to do a string quartet arrangement and the odd slieighbell or tambourine was overdubbed afterwards. I also felt it rather odd that “A Christmas Song” was not the A-Side especially as the single was released in December right on top of Christmas.

The first of the 4 previously unreleased tracks is “Serenade To A Cuckoo (Take 1)” and on the 13th June 1968 they recorded the song twice, the 2nd Take was the version they used for the master on the album and was slightly longer by about 22 seconds. You can hear the difference between the 2 takes and this unreleased version is played at a bit of a slower pace with its swing and does have a slightly different feel about it.

It’s all about pace with the next bonus track too “Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You (Faster Version)” and one could even perhaps argue that they could easily of slowed one track down and made the other one faster to make it look like your getting something a bit new here :)))))). But I can assure that is not the case and they are different, and this version was recorded a month earlier than the master version that appeared on the album on the same day as the previous track, and Ian Anderson dedicates it to Terry Ellis on the intro.

The 5th bonus track “Move On Alone (Flute Version)” was recorded on the 2nd July 1968 and at this stage the song had not got vocals on it, and this was actually take 6 of the backing track to which was first recorded with no orchestra on that day with Anderson’s flute instead. They have also added the vocal track to this mix as well which came from take 8 of the master track recorded 25 days later on the 27th July. Anderson decided that the flute may of been a bit too intruding on Abrahams guitar and as it was really his moment he decided to have it removed and replaced with a brass section that was once again arranged by David Palmer. It’s also thought that Abrahams had never noticed the flute had been replaced till after the album was made too.

The final bonus track “Ultimate Confusion” is an instrumental piece that has never seen the light of day before. It never got as far as another take because basically it was just a mad jam and they thought it was bollox :)))))). It’s more of a mess around and an experimental piece that’s perhaps even Avant Garde and quite unusual but also quite interesting. It’s certainly not gonna set the world on fire but I was glad that they decided to include it here.

Overall the bonus tracks on the first discs are very good and I have no problem listening to this CD as an whole with them included here either. Steve Wilson has done a terrific job with these mixes too.

CD 2.

There is nothing new about the bonus material on the second disc, not even the mixes and no doubt the material we have here has surfaced in one place or another. But as it was originally from this decade and era it’s perhaps good to have it all in the right place and what you get here is another fine selection of bonus material. The 2nd CD comes with 20 bonus tracks which have an overall playing time of 59 minutes, 43 seconds.

The first 9 tracks on this disc come from two different sessions that was recorded live for John Peel’s Top Gear at the BBC Studios in Piccadilly London. Both sessions were recorded in mono only and was previously released back in 2008 on the This Was 40th Anniversary 2 CD Deluxe Edition.

The first session was recorded on the 23rd July 1968 to which they played the following 5 songs “So Much Trouble“. “My Sunday Feeling“. “Serenade To A Cuckoo“. “Cat’s Squirrel” and “A Song For Jeffrey“. Four of these songs  eventually wound up on their debut album and it was only the Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee song “So Much Trouble” that never found it’s way on it.

The second session recorded at the BBC for John Peel’s Top Gear was recorded a month after the bands debut album was released on the 5th November 1968 to which they played the following 4 songs. “Love Story“. “Stormy Monday“. “Beggar’s Farm“. and “Dharma For One“. Even though the recordings are only in mono they are very good and no doubt some of these tracks would of also surfaced before 2008 on various other box sets and compilations.

17 of the 20 tracks on this 2nd disc are all original mono recordings and next couple of tracks you get here were in fact were released on the 1st official Jethro Tull single to which “A Song For Jeffrey” was the A-Side and the single was released a couple of weeks before the album in September 1968. It was a song that Anderson wrote on a slide guitar whilst he was learning new things about playing rhythm guitar.

It’s title was in recognition that although Jeffrey Hammond had left The John Evan Band to go to art school, he was still very much part of the band has he used to still go and see the band play and eventually would wind back up in the band to which he did later on. The B-Side “One For John Gee” was an instrumental piece written by Abrahams and as they had already written a song for Jeffrey they thought it would be fitting to name the piece in recognition of John Gee who gave the band its residency at the Marquee Club.

The next 3 tracks were also bonus tracks on the 1st CD to which are “Someday The Sun Won’t Shine For You (Faster Version)“. “Love Story” and “A Christmas Song“. The only difference on this disc is that these are the original mono recordings.

Up next we get the original mono recordings of the first intended single of the band to which was never officially released and only a few copies slipped onto the black market. The A-Side “Sunshine Day” was penned by Abrahams and recorded at the CBS Studios between the 6th and 7th January 1968 and was produced by Derek Lawrence. Anderson cannot even recall ever being involved in the recording of the song, but according to Lawrence he did some backing vocals along with Tony Wilson (later of Hot Chocolate).

The B-Side “Aeroplane” also came from the sessions done with Lawrence only this was recorded in the CBS Studios back in October 1967 whilst the band was known as The John Evan Smash. Anderson & Cornick penned the song and it features Both Anderson & Cornick are on the record along with John Evans, Barrie Barlow and guitarist Neil Smith. Both Tony Wilkinson and Neil Valentine also played sax on the song but they somehow got edited out of the original recording, perhaps for good reason too.

Also during that same session with Derek Lawrence as the The John Evan Smash another song written by Anderson & CornickBlues For The 18th” got recorded which is included here. I quite like Anderson’s voice on this song and Anderson also found it easier to write songs with Cornick too. Both “Aeroplane” and “Blues For The 18th” also had a flute on them, but as Anderson recalls he was not even playing the flute at this time and could not get a note out of it until December 1967 and Lawrence must of brought in a session player to play the flute.

The final 3 tracks on CD 2 are the only stereo tracks on the disc and only one of them is a song which is “Love Story” and this is the 1969 US Promo Single Stereo Mix for FM Radio Airplay. The final couple of tracks are US FM Radio Spots which were used to advertise the American release of the album. I quite like how they hype up the band as the best new group and new sound and also some American DJ announcing Jethro Tull as an uncommon name who play uncommon music :))))) they are quite interesting to hear too.

Disc 3.

The final disc also contains 20 tracks and has an overall playing time of 76 minutes, 32 seconds and what you do get here is the UK original 1968 mixes of the album This Was twice over. The first 10 tracks are the original 1968 stereo mixes of the album. The remaining 10 tracks are mono mixes of the album only for some reason these mono mixes are the 2008 remasters that was included on the This Was 40th Anniversary 2 CD Deluxe Edition. I can only presume that these mono remasters are what they consider to be the best recordings of the mono version of the album.

Although the album was released in the UK with both mono and stereo releases the mono recordings were soon phased out after about 3 months, some say that they were phased out after a couple of weeks of the album release, however it was more likely within 3 months or a bit longer, though they are extremely rare to come by these days.

It’s also interesting that the stereo release of the album was also released with 2 different mixes. The difference is with the panning of the vocals and instruments in the two mixes. Mix 2 was released in the US and somehow that mix found its way back here in the UK and is the most common mix used in all countries ever since. This mix featured Anderson’s voice panned to the left and his flute to the right on the opening track. Mix 1 had Anderson’s vocals and flute panned to the left and has never surfaced on CD before now, and that is the stereo mix they have included on this CD.

They have also included the original mix 2 that was originally only intended for the US on the DVD which I go through now.

DVD.

Scene 1

The DVD’s main menu presents you with two options to choose from. The first option being the new mixes done by Steve Wilson and the second being the flat transfer of the original US stereo mix of the album to which indecently is the mix on all the releases since 1969 from Mix 2. Only the albums that got released before this release had the Mix 1 stereo mix on them. Clicking on the first option will present you with the following menu below. Clicking on the second option will play the original album.

Scene 2

As you can see from the menu above, this menu is all related to the Steve Wilson mixes and this menu has 5 options to choose from. The first three options “Play Album”. “Track Select”. “Audio Select” are related to new mixes of the albums 10 tracks, and the other two options “Associated Recordings” contain the bonus tracks.

Clicking on “Play Album” will play the album in stereo by default and I myself like to head into the “Audio Select” to make my preferred choice of audio before playing the album. But you can also simply change the audio by pressing the audio button on the remote control of your player.

Scene 3

By clicking on the “Track Select” you can simply select any one of the albums 10 tracks to play if you have not got time to listen to the whole album, or simply choose a favourite track to listen too or to play to a friend. The latter is perhaps the most times I would use this menu because in general I like to listen to the whole album. You can always skip a track as well with the buttons on your remote should you not want to listen to it.

Scene 4

The “Audio Select” menu is where you can select your desired choice of audio, and for surround freak like myself the DTS surround mix will always be my preferred choice. I have always preferred the DTS decoder over the standard AC3 which is Dolby Digital. Though all 3 of the audio soundtracks on this DVD are high quality audio format of 96/24 and are very good. Both of the surround mixes for the main album are in 4.1 only, and there is no 5.1 surround mix simply because the album was recorded onto 4 tracks.

The only 5.1 mixes you get on this release are the couple of bonus tracks that are contained in the first of the “Associated Recordings” which are “Love Story” and “A Christmas Song“. Both of these songs were recorded on 8 track at Morgan Studios and also come with a high quality audio format of 96/24 and are very good.

The second of the “Associated Recordings” contains 4 bonus tracks which are “Serenade To A Cuckoo (Take 1)“. “Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You (Faster Version)“. “Move On Alone (Flute Version)” and “Ultimate Confusion“. These 4 tracks are in stereo only, and the only difference between the tracks here in relation to those on the 1st CD is that they come with a high quality audio format of 96/24 instead of 44.1/16. Just like the album these tracks were recorded at Sound Techniques on 4 track only and Wilson did not see the point in giving them a 4.1 mix.

Scene 5

Like with all the DVD’s that come in these Book Editions of Jethro Tull you can see they have taken the time to include a slide show of pictures that display whilst you listen to the tracks on the album. You get quite a few photos displayed throughout all the tracks on the album and its a lot better than having one still picture that could potentially do more harm to your flat panel TV by burning out a few pixels, or even the backlight on LED displays. It’s good to see they have a good team behind them unlike the Mascot Group who did the DVD for Ayreon in my last review.

The Steve Wilson Stereo & Surround Mixes.

Once again Steve Wilson is back at the helm with his new mixes of the album both in stereo and multichannel surround sound and he really brings out the best with these recordings, and in my opinion his mixes are way better than the original mixes regardless of them being in surround sound or just stereo. Even the stereo mixes he has done for this album have really brought this album back to life, and I have never heard this album sound as good as this either.

No doubt doing a surround mix from 4 track master tapes was always gonna present a problem, but I have to say how Wilson has worked with the 4 tracks by separating some of them (where they never had more than 2 things going on at the same time) he’s done the bees knees with this mix. The job he has done here is just as good as having a 5.1 mix, even if there is nothing in the centre channel.

To be honest I was not expecting a great deal from a 4.1 mix when I first seen this release announced on the Jetrho Tull website before I purchased it, and I have in the past have in the past brought some Quad mixes to which I do not rate a lot at all. For example Rick Wakeman’s Six Wives album  I brought with a quad mix and in relation the stereo mix I already had of the album, I thought I wasted my money buying it. It also put me off buying the other albums he released with Quad mixes too.

But there is a difference between a Quad mix and a 4.1 mix and it’s that .1 Sub channel that makes all the difference. It makes one hell of a difference having your subwoofer control the bass in your speakers and that’s where 4.0 and 5.0 mixes really suffer. I would rather be missing the centre speaker which is only the dialogue speaker that most would use to put the vocals in. No doubt Wilson could of done a 5.1 mix and even placed the vocals in the centre speaker, but with having so little he could separate from the 4 tracks he very much made the wise decision to go with 4.1.

Another reason why Wilson would of chose not to place the vocals in the centre speaker would of been down to him trying not lose anything from the way the original recording sounded and this is what I do admire a lot about Steve Wilson and his mixes. Even though there were two stereo mixes of the original album released with reverse panning being the marginal difference, depending on which mix you had the vocals were either placed to the left or the right in the mix. So it would not have made a lot of sense to place them in the centre speaker in the first place, and by doing so purists might have been banging on doors :)))))).

I think with any surround mix you have to pay a lot of attention to the original stereo mix, and just because you have an array of tracks to play with you cannot simply start placing any instrument anywhere for the sake of it. What you do not want to be destroying is the focal point which will always be coming from the two front speakers and the centre speaker. Take too much away from the stereo field and will you will create a gap and it sound nothing like that record you have heard for donkeys years and are accustomed to hearing it that way.

This is where many sound engineers go wrong and to be honest there are not many GREAT! engineers who can successfully do GREAT! surround mixes. I would even go as far as to say that there are less than a hundred in relation to the thousands who can do GREAT! stereo mixes. Unlike Arjen Lucassen who is still very much learning the art of surround mixing and is making progress. Steven Wilson is quite a master at it and in my top 5 when it comes to working in this field, and this 4.1 mix is quite magical.

Even the stereo mixes on every track are golden, and not just the odd track here and there sound better for the new mixes, which is something I also felt Arjen did not get quite right on his own album Into The Electric Castle that was in my last review.

Musicians & Credits…

Jethro-Tull-1968

Produce by Terry Ellis & Jethro Tull for Chrysalis Productions. Recording Engineer Victor Gamm. Cover Concept by Terry Ellis & Ian Anderson. Artwork by Phil Smee at Waldo’s Design & Dream Emporium. Photography by Brian Ward. Martin Webb. Max Browne & Hajo Muller. Surround & New Stereo Mixes by Steven Wilson. DVD Authoring by Ray Shulman at Isonic.

Musicians.
Ian Anderson: Lead Vocals (Tracks 1, 3, 7, 9) – Flute – Harmonica – Claghorn – Piano – Backing Vocals.
Mick Abrhams: Guitar – 9 String Guitar – Lead Vocals (Track 4) – Backing Vocals.
Glen Cornick: Bass Guitar.
Clive Blunker: Drums – Hooter & Charm Bracelet.

Additional Musicians.
David Palmer: French horn and orchestral arrangement.

The Album Tracks In Review…

There is perhaps no questioning the promotional skills of Ian Ellis and for a debut album to reach number 10 in the UK album charts is quite an achievement for a band that had hardly been known at all 6 months earlier. But the album was very well received an was even greeted well by the music critics. But no doubt the band were very busy before the album was released not just with having a residency at the Marquee Club and on the 29th June 1968 they played a free concert in Hyde Park supporting Tyrannosaurus Rex along with Pink Floyd and Roy Harper. But it was at the Sunbury Jazz and Blues Festival in August 1968 that really got things going and enough for more people to take notice.

The festival was held every year and there was always one unknown band that got to make it since it had been running. The band stole the show according the music press who gave them raving reviews. John Peel also did his bit at the BBC for them and soon they was also making appearances on TV. The album got released in the US in February and reached 69 in the Billboard charts. Jethro Tull were not quite ready to take America by storm but it would not be long before they did, and rest is pretty much more or less history.

I suppose it could be said that the album This Was these days does not quite measure up to the praise it got 50 years ago when you look at how well the band progressed after its release. Many would even say when you look at how well their next album Stand Up turned out by comparing it to their debut album, it could be said that “This Was” Jethro Tull but “This Is” the real Jethro Tull. But their debut album really is not that far away when you look at how it was made musically. You still have the combination of blues and Jazz and the classical influences, although predominately it is perhaps more on the blues side of things. But that is not necessary a bad thing either, but the big question is. Does it still stand up after 50 years? Well let’s find out as I got through the albums 10 tracks.

Track 1. My Sunday Feeling.

Well no doubt the opening track of the album is perhaps so typical of the standard of blues you got from many bands during the invasion of British Blues scene back in 60’s. Bands such as The Rolling Stones, Cream and many others were at it well before, many were influenced by the black music that came out decades before from the banks of the Mississippi down to New Orleans in the States.

I guess you could say even The John Evan Band were at it too, and by the time it had changed to a 4 piece and its name to Jethro Tull they was still churning it out and bands like Fleetwood Mac and The Groundhogs surfaced in the same year. Though the latter of those two had been knocking out the blues well beforehand as a support band for John Lee Hooker but around the same time in 1968 they too were Scratching The Surface so to speak.

To be honest there is quite a few tracks on this album that remind of The Groundhogs perhaps more than any other band, apart from the flute and vocals of course, and the flute does make a difference on a song like this. But musically you could say they shared the same style more less and even though both bands had a very good drummer and bass player, I personally felt that Jethro Tull were much more of a closer knit and tighter outfit. You can hear it just by listening to this opening song too.

Although the song was written by Ian Anderson the 12 bar blues was never really his thing, but I guess as it was more Mick Abrahams thing he knew it would keep him happy enough. I think it’s quite a good song that has a really great swing to it. I also think that Clive Bunker was the best drummer Jethro Tull ever had. The song as been in and out the bands live set many times over it’s 50 years and has been played a lot more than many of the songs I would of loved to have heard from some of their other albums.

Track 2. Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You.

Another Anderson penned song and this is a more of a slower acoustic 3 chord blues standard that features both Anderson and Abrahams together in unison on vocals and features Abrahams on guitar and Anderson on the old Gob Iron instead of the flute, he can play the thing too. I have always admired his technique on the instrument to which he was influenced by the style of Sonny Terry the American folk blues artist who was known for his energetic blues harmonica style. It’s also arranged similarly to Big Bill Broonzy’s blues standard “Key to the Highway“.

Track 3. Beggars Farm.

This as always been my favourite track on this album and “Beggars Farm” is very much more of Ian Anderson’s style of writing even though he co-wrote this with Abrahams. This is perhaps a song you could put on the album Stand Up and it would fit with the material on that album like a glove. Though no doubt many styles have come from Anderson’s writing over the many years and besides the blues rock side of things we have here, there is also a folky element about it too.

The song has a terrific build to it and Bunkers drums tick along like a clock to it, and the fills he puts into it are very much precise. Anderson’s vocals raspy flute do the business, Cornick has all the right grooves on the bass and Abrahams guitar has quite a melodic feel to it’s rhythm. This is very much to me another Jethro Tull classic and merits my top spot on the album award.

Track 4. Move On Alone.

A short bluesy ballad of a song written by Abrahams and he gets to sing lead vocals on it too and does a fine job indeed. It was originally recorded with Anderson playing flute on the track, but before the album was released it was replaced with a brass section arranged by David Palmer and it works very well in giving it more of a homely feel and perhaps even a Fleetwood Mac feel about it. It’s another fine song and considering both the bass and drums were recorded onto one track only they sound GREAT!.

Track 5. Serenade To A Cuckoo.

The band jazz things up for the longest track on the album and it’s one of the 4 instrumental pieces on the album and was penned by the American Jazz multi-instrumentalist Roland Kirk who played and an array of saxes, flutes and clarinets, some even at the same time as seen in this photo of him from him 1972.

800px-Roland-Kirk

Kirk wrote the piece back in 1964 and it featured on the album I Talk With Spirits which is the very album that Jeffrey Hammond played to Anderson and not only did he learn and memorised the piece well, but he also picked up on Kirk’s vocalizing style on the flute. It became his party piece at the Marquee and even though this version is some 1 minute 35 seconds longer than Kirk’s original. Anderson plays the flute throughout the entirety of its  6 minutes 8 seconds here.

No doubt the whole band are well into the Jazz swing on this fine piece and it was also one of those fine pieces that went down very well with the audience back in those days too. To be honest just like Bach’sBourrée” worked so well on Stand Up this is another piece that could of quite of easily worked on that album too. It’s very much a contender for the top spot on the album and an excellent piece of Jazz.

Track 6. Dharma For One.

Another of the instrumental pieces on the album and this one you could say is Clive Bunker’s party piece and it was written by Anderson and Bunker. I suppose in some terms you could say that what John Bonham done for Led Zeppelin’sMoby DickClive Bunker did for Jethro Tull here and he really was a superb drummer and no way would this album be as tight as it was without him either. Like I mentioned earlier he was by far this bands best ever drummer.

Besides Bunker’s drum solo the piece has a touch of the east to it which most likely inspired the title of which “Dharma” is an Indian word meaning “the way, the path or the truth”. Anderson also plays Claghorn on the piece besides his flute and this was actually something he knocked up himself by attaching a sax mouthpiece to a bamboo flute and  a plastic toy trumpet he brought from Woolworths to which he cut the bell end off and attached it to the end.

It was Jeffrey Hammond who dubbed it the Claghorn when he seen Anderson with it on stage at the Marquee Club. “Dharma For One” is another excellent track on the album and this one got dragged out a lot at their early live shows and could go on as long as 20 minutes in some cases.

Track 7. It’s Breaking Me Up.

Another standard blues song and once again this is penned by Anderson though this is perhaps familiar with many blues songs and even “Baby What You Want To Me Do” written by Jimmy Reed way back in 1959 springs to mind here. Anderson is back on he old Gob Iron for this one and once again both he and Abrahams take on the vocal duties. Speaking of the vocals this is one they both struggled with to sing live and could not get it quite in unison with one another to how they done it here in the studio. It’s another fine song and a GREAT! track.

Track 8. Cat’s Squirrel.

Another instrumental track and this one was traditionally arranged by Abrahams and one of the pieces he brought with him when he joined the band. Abrahams was inspired to play piece after hearing Eric Clapton play with it with Cream and it was not really a piece Anderson wanted to play or have on the album either. But has it was another party piece for Abrahams he let it go and decided to include it on the album. I think another reason why it was included on the album was because it also went down well with their fans, so Anderson thought maybe it would be a good idea to record it and let them have something in return for supporting them.

I can perhaps see why Anderson never wanted it to be included because effectively it’s perhaps something more like a jam more than anything else though it’s not a bad track and to be honest you can hear the same sort of thing on The Groundhogs 2nd album Blues Obituary that came out just over a year later.

Track 9. A Song For Jeffrey.

The only single release from the album and it actually got released twice on a single. The first being here in the UK on the 13th September 1968 to which it was the A-Side. Then it got released in the US in February 1969 as the B of “Love Story“. It’s also been released on many compilation and live albums and is perhaps the most featured song that the band play live from this album. To be honest I have no idea what Anderson is singing the song through, but it’s very hard to catch what he is singing and almost like he shut himself in a cupboard whilst singing it :)))))).

But the music carries the song well enough and it’s quite a mixture of psychedelic blues, jazz and folk. His flute and harmonica work very well in the song too. and because the song does step away from the blues Anderson was quite surprised how well Abrahams worked his way through it on the guitar. “A Song For Jeffrey” is another really GREAT! song and is considered as one of the albums highlights by many too.

10. Round.

The final track is a very short instrumental piece that is credited to the band. It’s all of a minute long and the 4.1 mix on the DVD does go round the speakers too :))))). Anderson recalls that they wanted another song to complete the album and were stuck for original material, and he did not really want to play another blues cover.

Terry Ellis came up with the idea of playing a round as in the case of the French nursery rhyme and in the song “Frère Jacques” more generally known in English as “Brother John“. So Anderson came up with a simple idea on the piano and the rest of the band played in a round around him, hence the title we have here too. It ROUNDS up the album very well indeed, although with it being only a minute long. You would perhaps be wise to avoid putting your money in a Jukebox to play it :))))).

Summary…

To sum up the 50th Anniversary DVD Book Edition of This Was by Jethro Tull. There can be no doubt that your are getting another quality well made package for the money. Even at it’s retail price of £35 its well worthy of its price point. The 98 page book alone makes an excellent read and contains a lot of insight into the bands early history of their career from the bands members including their management. It also contains a 12 page in depth feature entitled “A View Frome The Clouds“. As told by Billy Ritchie the founder member of the Scottish band 1-2-3 who’s name got changed by the Ellis-Wright Agency to the Clouds. Plus much more than I have focused on in my review here.

Regarding the 4 discs there is no doubt that the bonus material is bountiful and much of it is the same thing, especially on the 3rd CD where you get the complete album twice over in stereo and mono. But there was not a lot of bonus material back then. But the real bonus regarding the CD’s is really on the 1st CD with the new mixes by Steven Wilson and these truly do not disappoint and I have to say they are BRILLIANT!. So too are the surround mixes on the DVD.

This Was was indeed the only album to feature the guitarist Mick Abrahams whose love of the blues was his reason for leaving to go on and form Blodwyn Pig. His personal love of the blues was the conflict between him and Ian Anderson which forced him to leave after the album was made. Back in 1968 the blues was still pretty much the IN-Thing and with a skilful blues guitarist like Abrahams his guitar playing was the motivation that reflected the blues on this particular album. There is no doubt that even Anderson himself wrote some the tracks on this album to cater for his blues playing, even if he did not want to go in that particular direction himself.

Ian Anderson seen the blues has something that had already been done by countless artists over the years, what he wanted was to create something new and step away from the same old thing. His vision to incorporate and fuse jazz, folk and classical styles into the blues can even be heard on this album, and some of the tracks on this album very much reflect the direction he wanted to go in at the time, and how the next album Stand Up turned out as well as it did. Some of the tracks on this album are even worthy of being put on Stand Up too.

The album This Was is not an album one can simply write off. I also could not say that “This Was Jethro Tull” and see the next album as being “This Is Jethro Tull“. Simply because some of the material is written in the same vein and its not marginally that different. My personal highlights from the album are as follows: “Beggar’s Farm“. “Serenade To A Cuckoo“. “Dharma For One” and “A Song For Jeffrey“.

Conclusion…

To conclude my review of this splendid quality package. It’s very much a package that presents the bands debut album with the respect it well and truly deserves. This 4 piece line up of Jethro Tull could certainly play the blues and do it in style. Regarding the blues side of things on this album it’s up there with the best, and it’s still very much an album that also blends in jazz, folk and classical styles that presents you with something that was new and fresh at the time, to which also went on to make the bands next album Stand Up so well.

This Was now stands up even more so with a new lease of life having Steven Wilson at the helm with his new mixes, and I can honestly say that he has totally breathed new life into these recordings, and this album has never sounded as good as it does now. They really make you want to play the album over and over again and they outstrip the original recordings. You simply cannot go wrong with this package, and according what I have read in the book you get inside it. Wilson’s new mixes of the album will also be released on vinyl later on.

To be honest I have never seen Jethro Tull’s debut album This Was as a mediocre album, and for me personally I could not fault any album the band released from this album back in 1968 up to their Heavy Horses album in 1978. I have also always regarded this album being much better than their 1979 album Stormwatch which to me was really the first crack I ever seen in Ian Anderson’s writing and was where it started to go downhill a bit more. No doubt Jethro Tull did go on to make another couple of GREAT! albums after that 1979 album and they have always been up there as one of my personal favourite bands of all time. But my Golden Era of the band has always been the first 10 years of their career from 1968 – 1978.

Even though Jethro Tull were not quite ready to take on America at this stage it would not be long before they did, and the Americans even took notice of their debut album when it was released in the following year. Although the band never played at Woodstock in 1969 both “Beggar’s Farm” and a “Serenade To A Cuckoo” can be heard blasting out of the PA System in the Documentary film of the festival.

As many will know Tony Iommi joined the band for a short stint after Abrahams departure and made an appearance with Jethro Tull on The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus TV show. Though it was not the band for him and not long after he went on to form Black Sabbath and Martin Barre winded up as the guitarist and enjoyed a 43 year career with the band. Jethro Tull effectively as always been Ian Anderson’s band and that’s how it still operates today.

Someday Soon’s Gonna Find You Way Down On Beggar’s Farm

The CD track listing is as follows:

Disc 1. (Steve Wilson Mixes)

01. My Sunday Feeling. 3:42.
02. Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You. 2:49.
03. Beggar’s Farm. 4:22.
04. Move On Alone. 1:59.
05. Serenade To A Cuckoo. 6:08.
06. Dharma For One. 4:14.
07. It’s Breaking Me Up. 5:03.
08. Cat’s Squirrel. 5:42.
09. A Song For Jeffrey. 3:21.
10. Round. 0:57.
11. Love Story. 3:03.
12. A Christmas Song. 3:08.
13. Serenade To A Cuckoo (Take 1). 5:46.
14. Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You (Faster Version). 2:36.
15. Move On Alone (Flute Version). 2:00.
16. Ultimate Confusion. 2:55.

Disc 2. (Associated – Live & Original Recordings)

01. So Much Trouble (BBC Sessions). 3:19.
02. My Sunday Feeling (BBC Sessions). 3:49.
03. Serenade To A Cuckoo (BBC Sessions). 3:37.
04. Cat’s Squirrel (BBC Sessions). 4:38.
05. A Song For Jeffrey (BBC Sessions). 3:13.
06. Love Story (BBC Sessions). 3:04.
07. Stormy Monday (BBC Sessions). 4:09.
08. Beggar’s Farm (BBC Sessions). 3:22.
09. Dharma For One (BBC Sessions). 3:46.
10. A Song For Jeffrey (Original Mono Mix). 3:22.
11. One For John Gee (Original Mono Mix). 2:07.
12. Someday The Sun Won’t Shine For You (Faster Version) (Mono Mix). 2:36.
13. Love Story (Original Mono Mix). 3:05.
14. A Christmas Song (Original Mono Mix). 3:06.
15. Sunshine Day (Original Mono Mix). 2:22.
16. Aeroplane (Original Mono Mix). 2:25.
17. Blues For The 18th (Original Mono Mix). 2:53.
18. Love Story (1969 US Promo Single Stereo Mix for FM Radio Airplay). 3:02.
19. US FM Radio Spot #1. 0:52.
20. US FM Radio Spot #2. 0:56.

Disc 3. (Original Album Mixes)

01. My Sunday Feeling (Original Stereo Mix). 3:41.
02. Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You (Original Stereo Mix). 2:47.
03. Beggar’s Farm (Original Stereo Mix). 4:21.
04. Move On Alone (Original Stereo Mix). 1:59.
05. Serenade To A Cuckoo (Original Stereo Mix). 6:08.
06. Dharma For One (Original Stereo Mix). 4:13.
07. It’s Breaking Me Up (Original Stereo Mix). 5:01.
08. Cat’s Squirrel (Original Stereo Mix). 5:39.
09. A Song For Jeffrey (Original Stereo Mix). 3:22.
10. Round (Original Stereo Mix). 1:00.
11. My Sunday Feeling (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 3:43.
12. Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 2:49.
13. Beggar’s Farm (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 4:23.
14. Move On Alone (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 2:00.
15. Serenade To A Cuckoo (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 6:07.
16. Dharma For One (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 4:13.
17. It’s Breaking Me Up (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 5:01.
18. Cat’s Squirrel (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 5:40.
19. A Song For Jeffrey (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 3:26.
20. Round (2008 Remastered Version – Mono). 0:59.

Lee’s overall Complete Package Value Rating…

The Packaging Rating Score. 10/10

The Price Point Rating Score. 10/10

The Bonus Material Rating Score. 7/10

The 4.1 Mix Rating Score. 10/10

The Original Album Rating Score. 7/10

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s